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Readers Write: March 9


Pullman Plant should be restored

Many native-Atlanta readers will respond positively to Charles Lawrence’s guest column on the old Pullman Plant (“Historic Pullman Yard Deserves Protection,” Opinion, Feb. 25). Those of us who grew up in Kirkwood probably passed by the imposing old buildings and yard every other day and consider it as something of a nostalgic icon. However, as the founder of the Atlanta Preservation Alliance, folks like Lawrence are critical in calling attention to — and being instrumental in — the restoration of historic city landmarks and facilities that are not only still practical and viable, but give atmosphere and distinction to a city.

It’s a great suggestion that the Pullman Plant (and yard) be restored and renovated for new life – similar to the Ponce City, Krog Street and Edgewood markets, and the Cabbagetown Mill among others. As Atlanta comes “full circle” on the Beltline and more people move in from the suburbs and beyond, they will value city life even more if its unique historic sites are preserved and functioning!

R. CARY BYNUM, ATLANTA

People have every right to protest

Recently, in the Readers Write section, a reader submitted a letter “Liberals should remember they lost,” Feb. 26, condemning the large turnouts at town hall meetings, specifically one held in Georgia. The writer states, “we recently had an election and that Rep. Hice, Sen. Isakson, and President Trump all won either in their district or statewide.” I’m not quite sure what the outcome of an election has to do with freedom of speech. We are concerned with a president who is restricting the freedom of the press, freedom of speech, and freedom of assembly. We the people are coming under fire for our concern about the deregulation of the environmental protections, financial protections and consumer protections. The press is also under fire for reporting the truth. We will speak, question, and assemble wherever and whenever we decide to.

DAVE FEDACK, DOUGLASVILLE




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