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Readers Write: Feb. 20


Youth will breathe new life into Braves

The Braves are moving into the new Suntrust Park with an admitted rebuilding strategy in place. They have shed huge salaries for young prospects to move this mission forward. But they have made three brilliant moves to move the process along, while giving the fans a sense of keeping a competitive product on the field. 1) They brought in R.A. Dickey to pitch. A Cy Young winner with the Mets in 2012, he will still baffle opponents with his knuckleball. More importantly, as is evident in his book “Wherever I Wind Up,” he will bring class into the clubhouse. 2) They brought in Bartolo Colon, an ageless wonder on the mound who will have the youthful new Braves surrounding him as he spins stories about baseball as it has been even before they were born. And 3) They now have Brandon Phillips who will be dearly missed by the fans in Cincinnati, as well as the community at large that he was so involved with in his time there. And his smile will infect all fans. The Braves are surrounding their youth movement with class, and it will show, sooner rather than later.

STEVE MORRISON, POWDER SPRINGS

What’s next after Flynn fiasco?

We are asked to believe that Russian hacking of our election process did not carry over to the days after the election. That might be difficult considering the latest news. Had the media not revealed the improper, and perhaps illegal, conversations between Flynn and the Russian ambassador, the White House was content to sit quiet relative to this situation. First, Flynn says he maybe, sort of, forgot what he talked about. Then the White House says Flynn was fired because he had not told the truth to Vice President Pence. Yet, Trump had known about the issue for almost a month. Which means that the president also chose to not tell his own VP. That alone is stunning and aligns with his lack of transparency on many things. What’s next, and where is Leon Jaworski when you need him?

MICHAEL BUCHANAN, ALPHARETTA




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