Readers Write: Feb. 28


Krugman a master of insinuation

Paul Krugman really should consider writing fiction, as he has a problem with facts. First of all, Krugman claims, “a foreign dictator intervened on behalf of a U.S. presidential candidate” in (“Does GOP accept subversion as price of achieving aims?,” Opinion, Feb. 20). The only thing we know for sure is that the Russians hacked into the DNC and published some of their emails. There is absolutely no proof whatsoever that a single vote was changed, manipulated, eliminated, or added. Krugman certainly is a master at condemnation by insinuation. The president is characterized as “oddly solicitous,” “rumors swirling,” “if it’s not innocent, it’s very bad indeed,” “unmistakable corruption of his party,” “His popular-vote-losing win was already suspect.” And on and on, with nary a shred of proof. Are we really expected to believe that just because the Democrats throw out charge after charge of wrongdoing, we should just take their word for it?

JUDITH MCCARTHY, ATLANTA

GOP must address climate change

I’m a father and grandfather who is worried about the effects of climate change on future generations. The urgency of immediate action to address climate change was stressed by experts speaking last week at the Carter Center. There are some hopeful signs coming from an unexpected place. Some Republican congresspersons are showing interest in creating legislation for dealing with climate change. A group of Republican elder statesmen are speaking out in favor of a carbon fee and dividend plan to address greenhouse gases. When faced with an earlier environmental crisis, the Republican Nixon Administration responded by signing the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act and creating the EPA. Now, at the time of our greatest environmental crisis, Republicans are in complete control of Congress. If they refuse to address the most important issue facing our children and grandchildren, they should be replaced.

MICHAEL WALLS, ATLANTA




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