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Readers Write: Feb. 22


90-day pause should improve vetting

To the letter-writer of (“Travel ban hurts our nation’s values,” Readers Write, Feb. 16), while I applaud you for taking part regarding the travel ban from seven predominately Muslim nations — as our president said, it is not a Muslim ban. Only seven out of the 51 predominately Muslim nations. It is a pause for 90 days to review and improve the vetting process. If it was a total ban based on religion, I would support you 100 percent.

On the other hand, how many Muslim countries ban people of the Jewish or Hindu faiths? How many Muslim countries ban Christian bibles?

My real question is, who would disagree with a temporary travel ban to improve the vetting process? Personally, I would rather see a halting of issuing visas from these seven countries identified by the Obama administration as havens for terrorist activity.

JAMES VAN VALKENBURG, SNELLVILLE

Lawmakers must listen to the people

I was at the constituents’ meeting in Greensboro on Feb. 10 for U.S. Rep. Jody Hice and U.S. senators David Perdue and Johnny Isakson. I went because I am concerned about several of the new administration’s executive orders and appointees. No one paid me to go. No one bussed me to the event. I am not a member of an organized political group. I, like several of my neighbors, went to be heard by the aides of our representatives. When those aides chose not to hear the people who were there, people became frustrated and angry, but the crowd was always under control and peaceful.

Our congressmen are supposed to represent us in D.C., but if their phone banks are full, they don’t respond to emails or letters, and they vote contrary to our wishes, what are we to do? It is time for all of our congressmen to listen to their constituents. They should hold regular town hall meetings where people can ask questions and voice concerns. Are you listening, Rep. Hice, Sen. Isakson, and Sen. Perdue?

BONNIE CRAMOND, ATHENS




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