Readers Write: Feb. 9


Protests only deepen U.S. divide

Our nation’s history has been punctuated by rare occasions where the efforts of masses of people were meant to change the actions of elected representatives — sometimes successfully. The draft riots during the Civil War, the veteran’s march on Washington after World War I, the civil rights marches and “student” protests to end the war in Vietnam were notable, historic events because of their rarity — but even then, only the marches for civil rights produced any lasting leadership or inspiration for the nation. Our current cacophony of protests, beginning with Occupy Wall Street, Black Lives Matter and the recent liberal feminist rally in Washington seem based on the notion that riots are effective politics. Which of these so far has produced any long-lasting, inspiring words that we remember today? Which of these will result in anything but deeper divisions within the nation? Mobs are rarely the source of cogent laws.

GARY O’NEILL, MARIETTA

Bookman stands up for truth

Once again, Jay Bookman clearly stands up for science and truth. See “The truth on climate shall set you free,” Opinion, Jan. 29. Jay reminds us that our government ought to act responsibly and not discourage truth-seeking.

I recall my Daddy standing in the pulpit and preaching similar words with tears in his eyes: “The truth will set you free!…” “Truth” which included verifiable scientific evidence and faith in each other and God.

Tradition of deep faith does not deny science. And, in fact, the truth of science impels deeply concerned souls to act when the evidence is incontrovertible, as it is with climate change. We are threatened by our own innocence. But now we know and must act. U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson recognizes greenhouse emissions need to be reduced. I hope he and other representatives join together to support revenue-neutral carbon pricing.

BOB JAMES, ATLANTA




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