You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myAJC.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myAJC.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myAJC.com.

Readers Write: Feb. 24


U.S. should ban declawing of cats

I am a feline-exclusive veterinarian for 15 years. I oppose declawing cats and strongly support legislation to ban declawing. It doesn’t matter how well declawing is performed nor how much pain medication is offered — the long-term consequences are similar and damaging to the cat.

This procedure is wrongly perceived as a quick fix for furniture damage; often performed on kittens before they learn appropriate scratching surfaces. Declawing requires amputation of the last bone on each toe. It is painful, can cause chronic pain, infection, lameness, and behavior problems that lead to relinquishment.

Declawing has been banned in eight U.S. cities where statistics show the number of cats relinquished to shelters has decreased. Similarly, the number of cats adopted from shelters has not decreased. Declawing is prohibited or unheard of in most other countries. Why is the U.S. still choosing amputation rather than education about a normal feline behavior?

STEPHANIE GLOBERMAN, VETERINARIAN IN MARIETTA

Lent an opportunity to practice compassion

March 1 marks the beginning of Lent, the 40-day period preceding Easter, when many Christians abstain from animal foods in remembrance of Jesus’ 40 days of fasting in the wilderness before launching his ministry.

The call to refrain from eating animals is as old as the Bible. In Genesis 1:29, God commands humans to eat only plants; then Prophet Isaiah predicts that “none will hurt or destroy on God’s holy mountain.”

A meat-free diet is not just about Christian devotion. Dozens of medical studies have linked consumption of animal products with elevated risk of heart failure, stroke, cancer, and other killer diseases. Undercover investigations have documented farm animals being caged, crowded, mutilated, beaten, and shocked.

Lent offers a superb opportunity to honor Christ’s powerful message of compassion, but also to protect the health of our family and our planet Earth by adopting a meat-free diet.

ANTONIO MATHERS, ATLANTA




Next Up in Opinion

Opinion: Can we see past our own cultural blind spots?

Michigan is set to become the 26th state to join the federal government in criminalizing female genital mutilation, even as two Detroit area doctors and one of their wives await trial for inflicting the procedure on a number of young girls. FGM, which is common in some parts of Africa and the Middle East, involves using a razor to remove all or part...
Opinion: You can’t take the low road to the high place

The other day, a Muslim saved a terrorist. It happened just after midnight Monday in London. The terrorist, according to authorities, was Darren Osborne, 47, from Cardiff, Wales, who drove a rented van 150 miles to the British capital, where he jumped a sidewalk and plowed into a crowd of worshipers outside a mosque as people were attending to a man...
Opinion: Let us plunge toward our fast-unfolding future

WASHINGTON — In 1859, when Manhattan still had many farms, near the Battery on the island’s southern tip The Great American Tea Company was launched. It grew, and outgrew its name, becoming in 1870 The Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company, which in 1912 begat the first A&P Economy Store, a semi-modern grocery store. By 1920, there were...
Opinion: … because fathers deserve more than just one day

I know Father’s Day was last weekend and all, but this weekend I’m making an overdue visit to the parental units, so this is where my thoughts still are. Dad sang a lot of songs to us as we were growing up, accompanied by his trusty ukulele. His repertoire was mostly traditional folk songs like “The Ballad of the Boll Weevil&rdquo...
Opinion: Health care plan would dig big Ga. budget hole
Opinion: Health care plan would dig big Ga. budget hole

Since its inception in the late 1960s, Medicaid has been a lifeline for the nearly 2 million Georgians who depend on it for vital health services. The modest medical coverage provided by Medicaid goes to the most vulnerable in our society. In fact, 92 percent of Medicaid goes to children, seniors or the disabled. Medicaid is administered by the state...
More Stories