Readers Write: April 14


Eroding home life degrades children’s education

The column (“School choice can’t erase biggest barriers,” News, April 3), hit the nail on the head. The biggest culprit, and thus the biggest opportunity contributing to poorly educated children, is the home environment. School choice, vouchers, teacher pay raises, building new school buildings, more testing, etc. are just initiatives that nibble around the edges. Kids raised in a stable, loving, two-parent, moral and drug-free environment in which education is a priority provides the greatest hope for educated and eventually productive and successful adults. The increase in the numbers of children falling short usually can be attributed to a growing number of home environments that don’t teach respect for others, responsibility and consequences for wrongdoing. I suspect a number of readers will take offense for me saying that; I think the degradation of our society is proportional to the decline in the role religion plays in the life of the family. So be it; however, just look around and evaluate what a growing secular society has brought us.

P.D. GOSSAGE, JOHNS CREEK

No action keeps Georgians unhealthy

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle paints a flowery picture of what health care under his leadership can be (“Ga. to have right prescription for Obamacare,” Opinion, April 1). However, like a true politician, he has failed to put his actions behind his words. When the Republican leadership refused to expand Medicaid, in the name of fighting Obamacare, it hurt the poorest and most medically fragile people of Georgia. When the rural hospitals in Georgia were forced to close, no funding came forward to help them stay open. Fortunately for Georgians, the block grant promised under Trumpcare failed, and will hopefully revive the talk and actions of the state legislature to expand Medicaid, support rural hospitals and provide affordable health care for all.

DEEDEE MURPHY, ATLANTA




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