Opinion: Why a bank loves baseball


Baseball is often hailed as America’s pastime, but SunTrust Park is already proving to be America’s Futuretime. From the design and technology to the amenities and experiences, even MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred recently noted the new home of the Atlanta Braves is a model for future ballparks and The Battery Atlanta represents a “watershed” event for baseball.

It is a rare occasion when a company secures the naming rights for a sports facility when the concept is simply a vision on paper. In fact, this may be a first.

But SunTrust signed up two years ago for a 25-year partnership with the Braves because we believed in that vision to create a 365-day-a-year destination – a multi-use complex that would serve as a beacon for the greater Atlanta region. And we named it SunTrust “Park” to connote a community gathering place where friends and families gather and where memories are made.

It started with the opportunity to stand by a partner we know and trust. The Atlanta Braves are first-class, on and off the field.

And we sealed the deal – the largest overall marketing investment in SunTrust’s history – because the partnership offered more than just putting our name on a stadium.

Not only does SunTrust Park enable outstanding local and national visibility, but also it allows our bank to reach more people and fulfill our purpose of lighting the way to financial well-being for all. Through programs onsite that we will activate and “The onUp Experience” at The Battery, we’ll engage fans and visitors to learn more about gaining financial confidence with fun and interactive baseball activities. Because after all, you can’t enjoy a good game if you are stressed about money.

It’s not yet home opening day, but we feel like we’ve already hit a grand slam to contribute to a win for both our community and company.

Go Braves! Play Ball!

Bill Rogers is chairman and CEO, SunTrust Banks Inc.



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