breaking news

Amid frigid temps, Gov. Deal issues emergency declaration

Opinion: Trump arrives in Asia with focus on trade, N. Korea


TOKYO — President Donald Trump on Sunday said he expects to meet with President Vladimir Putin of Russia next week to discuss confronting the threat from North Korea, part of a 12-day, five-country tour through Asia that started with his arrival in Japan and is very likely to be dominated by discussions about trade and Pyongyang’s nuclear program.

In a speech to U.S. troops after Air Force One landed at Yokota Air Base here on a crisp, sunny morning, Trump never mentioned North Korea, but he said the U.S. military stood ready to defend the country and “fight to overpower” its adversaries.

Trump’s trip to the continent will be the longest by a U.S. president in more than 25 years. Ahead of what his advisers called a grueling schedule of meetings and summits, the president will get a chance to relax by playing golf on Sunday afternoon with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan at Kasumigaseki Country Club.

The outing is reciprocation for a round that Trump hosted in Palm Beach, Florida, in February for Abe and Ernie Els, once the world’s top golfer. For Sunday’s round, Abe has invited Hideki Matsuyama, a Japanese golfer ranked fourth in the world.

“Prime Minister Abe is called a trainer of wild animals,” said Fumio Hirai, a commentator on a morning news show on Fuji TV. “And the world is watching how he does with President Trump.”

The already extensive trip grew longer still Friday when Trump abruptly announced to reporters that he would attend the East Asia Summit in Manila on Nov. 14, adding a day to his travels.

Before leaving for Asia, Trump stopped in Honolulu, where he visited the headquarters of the U.S. Pacific Command and made a sunset visit to the USS Arizona Memorial, which honors the ship on which 1,177 Americans were killed during the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.

During the briefing, military officials showed Trump a huge map of the region, with laminated stickers marking the locations of U.S. forces, according to a U.S. official. Their goal was to impress upon the president — who has suggested that allies must share more of the costs of their own defense — that the U.S. military presence in places like South Korea, Japan and the Philippines was not a matter of charity. “We’re not there for them; we’re there for us,” Adm. Harry B. Harris Jr., head of the Pacific Command, told Trump, the official said.

That theme is likely to be highlighted again Tuesday when Trump is in South Korea.

White House officials have framed the trip as a chance for Trump to showcase his warm relationships with world leaders including Abe and President Xi Jinping of China, as well as to demand trade deals more favorable to the United States after his decision to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership. But it will also highlight the uncertainty in the region and around the world about what to expect from the Trump administration, and the degree to which major powers are charting their own course in the absence of clear signals from the U.S.

Trump’s ability to stay on message during a lengthy and physically demanding trip will most likely be tested, with many opportunities for gaffes or intemperate language. Asked last week whether the president would seek to temper his rhetoric while he traveled through the region, his national security adviser was frank.

“The president will use whatever language he wants to use, obviously,” Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster told reporters. “I don’t think the president really modulates his language — have you noticed him do that?”

Writes for The New York Times.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Opinion

Opinion: Republicans must lead in upcoming abortion debate

This year, as every year, I will be joining the hundreds of thousands who will be arriving in Washington, D.C., for the March for Life, noting the anniversary of the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, which legalized abortion on demand in our country. The event has taken place every year since 1973 and will continue to take place every year until this disastrous...
Opinion: We have a racist in the White House

For U.S. Sen. David Perdue, memory works in a very odd way. Or so he claims. Last Friday, Perdue and a colleague, U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas, told the world that they “do not recall” racist comments made a day earlier by President Trump in an immigration meeting. That lack of recollection seemed astonishing. In that meeting, Trump...
Readers Write: Jan. 17

Litter disrespects entire communities You know the idiom about the canary in the coal mine? Miners would carry caged canaries down in the mine tunnels. If hazardous atmosphere was encountered, the canary would show symptoms before the miners, serving as a warning sign for their safety. Could it be that litter is our canary in the coal mine? Throughout...
On the left, the deal for the Dreamers should be the only thing that matters
On the left, the deal for the Dreamers should be the only thing that matters

Should you care about giving in on a wall if those under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals get to stay in this country? A roundup of editorials Tuesday takes a look at the issue. From The Los Angeles Times: Fixing DACA has become a fight to cover both parties sins when it comes to illegal immigration.   From U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar...
The right is urging Trump not to give in on the wall
The right is urging Trump not to give in on the wall

President Donald Trump needs to hold firm to his call for a wall across the country’s southern border whether there is a deal on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or not. A roundup of editorials Tuesday takes a look at the issue. From the National Review: Democrats should give Trump the wall in exchange for a DACA deal. They can always take...
More Stories