You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myAJC.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myAJC.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myAJC.com.

Georgia’s tax policy takes one step forward, two steps back


The 14-year wait may finally be nearing an end.

Ever since Republicans took control of the governor’s mansion and state Senate in 2003 — the House took them two years longer — they have been talking about cutting and flattening Georgia’s income-tax rate. Despite multiple campaign promises and the recommendations of a special tax-reform commission, the closest they’ve come is passing a constitutional amendment to keep the top rate from rising above the current 6 percent.

But this past week the House approved a measure to set a single, flat rate of 5.4 percent. To offset the elimination of the lower five brackets, lawmakers added a tax credit for working families. (I expect senators to tweak that element to level things out for low-income Georgians without children.)

The net effect on revenues should be minimal: a savings to taxpayers of about $18 million a year, or about one-sixth of 1 percent of next year’s income-tax revenues, according to state forecasts.

That won’t satisfy Republicans’ appetites for tax cuts. But there are two considerations here.

First is that Gov. Nathan Deal has made it clear he won’t sign a bill with a significant cut to income-tax revenues, citing the need to maintain Georgia’s AAA credit rating and to continue adding to the state’s reserves. Other states have managed to implement well-designed tax cuts without hurting their credit — North Carolina is a pertinent example — but that argument will have to wait for Deal’s successor.

The second consideration is this bill, authored by Ways and Means Chairman Jay Powell, R-Camilla, makes important structural changes that stand on their own while also laying the groundwork for future rate reductions. Lowering the top tax rate by 10 percent would make Georgia more competitive with our neighbors and improve incentives to work and invest in our state. Flattening the brackets takes out needless complexity in the tax code. Another good provision in the bill indexes the standard and dependent deductions for inflation.

It’s a good thing this bill is moving along, because otherwise it hasn’t been a stellar legislative session for tax policy.

House members have passed a bill to tax more online sales and, late Friday, added a tax hike on used-car sales. Earlier Friday they defeated a tax on ride-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft, before taking the bill up again and passing it.

On the flip side, they have considered proposals that may not be terrible tax policy, but sure look bad. They passed a sales-tax exemption for repairs of yachts and other big boats, and were still weighing a tax break on jet-fuel purchases by commercial airlines. The latter bill would help Delta Air Lines, which gained and lost a similar tax break in recent years, generating strong feelings on both sides of the issue.

On an individual basis, it’s possible for someone (not me) to defend each of these smaller tax bills as a way to attract businesses or grow the economy. Absent more sweeping tax reform, some people just sigh and accept it as better than nothing.

That attitude is ultimately self-defeating. More sweeping tax reform has proved elusive in large part because, cumulatively, these smaller bills create more constituencies for a complex tax code.

The flat-tax bill is a step in the right direction. It’s too bad the other bills would make further progress all the more difficult.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Opinion

Opinion: Democrats vs. ‘deplorables’ in Montana, Georgia’s 6th District
Opinion: Democrats vs. ‘deplorables’ in Montana, Georgia’s 6th District

Democratic U.S. Congresstional candidate Rob Quist delivers a concession speech to supporters, May 25.
Readers Write: May 30

Terrorists do not deserve our protection I am a 70-year-old Atlantan with no relatives or friends in Manchester. I am so angry about the bombing. The Brits are an extension of us. I travel globally frequently, and I am stopped at security for hairspray and manicure scissors while known terrorists can come and go at will. Why can’t the free world...
Opinion: On JFK's 100th birthday, Trump repudiates his legacy
Opinion: On JFK's 100th birthday, Trump repudiates his legacy

Former presidents George H.W. Bush and Jimmy Carter are both over 90, and still with us — making it just barely conceivable that John F. Kennedy might have lived to celebrate his 100th birthday on Monday, if he had not been assassinated in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963. Surely JFK would have noted a contrast between his Jan. 20, 1961, inaugural...
After 23 years as a K-12 parent, I’m done. Five parting tips for schools.
After 23 years as a K-12 parent, I’m done. Five parting tips for schools.

My twins, the youngest of my four children, graduate high school today, ending my 23 year relationship with K-12 public schools in Georgia. I have been packing lunches, going on field trips and collecting for teacher gifts since August of 1993. My calendar is now cleared of curriculum nights, book fairs and school concerts. High school graduation...
Opinion: Assault on Guardian reporter is not a gray area

The first question you have to wonder concerning the assault and battery allegedly committed by Montana congressional candidate Greg Gianforte is: How could he possibly have put out a miserable, lying cover story when there were at least four witnesses in the room? The second question is: Do you regret early voting yet? Here’s the account from...
More Stories