Which students are winning top science prizes? Children of immigrants.


Much of the debate around immigration and education focuses on what immigrants take from the school districts in terms of cost. A new report looks at what they bring to U.S. schools — a strong performance in science.

A new report from the National Foundation for American Policy notes 33 of 40 finalists in the 2016 Intel Science Talent Search were the children of immigrants. Considered the most prestigious high school science competition in the country with three top awards of $150,000, the event is organized by the Society for Science & the Public. (The talent search is being sponsored this year by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.)

According to the report: “The evidence indicates that the children of immigrants are increasing their influence on science in America. Sixty percent (24 of 40) of the finalists of the 2004 Intel Science Talent Search had at least one immigrant parent. In 2011, that proportion rose to 70 percent (28 of 40) who had at least one immigrant parent. And in 2016, the number rose again to 83 percent (33 of 40) of the finalists of the Intel Science Talent Search who had at least one immigrant parent.”

To read more, go to the AJC Get Schooled blog.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Education

Was racism behind black cheerleader being cropped from Dunwoody High photo?
Was racism behind black cheerleader being cropped from Dunwoody High photo?

Students at Dunwoody High School are crying racism after a black cheerleader was cropped out of a team picture. Social media posts popped up over the weekend showing the full photo and its edited version, which eliminated the only black member in the picture. Several dozen students protested outside the school Monday morning, saying they wanted fair...
Fort Valley State starts new scholarship that includes study abroad program
Fort Valley State starts new scholarship that includes study abroad program

Fort Valley State University officials announced Friday a new scholarship program for freshmen students that will allow them to study abroad. Students selected for the Global Innovators Scholarship Program will receive a $40,000 scholarship, awarded as $10,000 each year for four years, to be used toward tuition, room, board and ...
Opinion: Rich white businessmen aren’t best judges of college presidents
Opinion: Rich white businessmen aren’t best judges of college presidents

Attorney Frank D. LoMonte is a professor of media law and director of the Brechner Center for Freedom of Information at the University of Florida, a think-tank advocating for government transparency. In this smart piece, he writes about something that occurs frequently in Georgia, high-level government hires decided behind...
Once-vaunted Ivy Prep’s struggle illustrates charter schools’ challenges
Once-vaunted Ivy Prep’s struggle illustrates charter schools’ challenges

A charter school once heralded as a beacon for public education has fallen on troubled times, raising questions about its survival. Ivy Preparatory Academy, a middle school for girls in Gwinnett County, was a poster child for the 2012 constitutional amendment that empowered the state to authorize — and pay for — more charter schools. Now...
APS police disciplined over test answers; GBI admits rules were vague
APS police disciplined over test answers; GBI admits rules were vague

The Atlanta Public Schools Police Department disciplined 17 officers after a probe into possible cheating on a state-administered test, and now the vague test rules are being rewritten. The district, in a statement released Friday by spokesman Ian Smith, said the review is coming to a close and the school resource officers were disciplined “in...
More Stories