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Which students are winning top science prizes? Children of immigrants.


Much of the debate around immigration and education focuses on what immigrants take from the school districts in terms of cost. A new report looks at what they bring to U.S. schools — a strong performance in science.

A new report from the National Foundation for American Policy notes 33 of 40 finalists in the 2016 Intel Science Talent Search were the children of immigrants. Considered the most prestigious high school science competition in the country with three top awards of $150,000, the event is organized by the Society for Science & the Public. (The talent search is being sponsored this year by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.)

According to the report: “The evidence indicates that the children of immigrants are increasing their influence on science in America. Sixty percent (24 of 40) of the finalists of the 2004 Intel Science Talent Search had at least one immigrant parent. In 2011, that proportion rose to 70 percent (28 of 40) who had at least one immigrant parent. And in 2016, the number rose again to 83 percent (33 of 40) of the finalists of the Intel Science Talent Search who had at least one immigrant parent.”

To read more, go to the AJC Get Schooled blog.



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