Retired generals urge Georgia to follow military’s lead in child care


Two retired generals are taking a stand on an issue not usually linked to military affairs — child care.

Writing in the AJC Get Schooled blog, Major General (Ret.) Ronald L. Johnson and Major General (Ret.) Jack C. Wheeler said, “We agree that access to early care is critical for national security, whether a child is from a military or civilian family. These programs play an essential role in ensuring that the next generation is prepared to become productive citizens.”

The former military leaders point out the Department of Defense recently exempted civilian child care workers from a hiring freeze because of the importance of their jobs to military families and readiness.

“In Georgia, there are nearly 500,000 children under age 6 who potentially need child care, since both parents or their only parent is in the workforce. That exceeds the number of licensed slots in our state by more than 125,000,” according to the generals.

To read more of their view and what they want the Legislature to do, go to the AJC Get Schooled blog.



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