Fulton County Schools students surpass state, national SAT benchmarks


Fulton County Schools students who took the SAT outperformed students nationally, according to information released Tuesday.

Students from the class of 2017 averaged 1051 on the test, higher than the national composite average 1040 and the state average 1050.

State officials also announced that fewer people are taking the test.

Of the highest scoring schools in the state, Fulton Schools were nearly one-third, with 7 of the 25 schools being from Fulton County.

“The SAT gives our district a valuable benchmark for measuring student achievement,” Superintendent Jeff Rose said. “Fulton County Schools has a record of strong SAT performance, and as a nationally normed test, the SAT allows us to see how our students compare to their peers nationally and locally.” 

Georgia Department of Education officials stressed that results not be compared to previous year figured, given a different scoring structure and benchmarks.

Forty-three percent of Fulton County Schools students met college and career-readiness benchmarks for reading/writing and math by The College Board, which administers the SAT. Across Georgia, 41 percent met the reading-writing benchmark, while 43 percent met the math benchmark.

 Here are the Fulton County Schools among the 

25 best-scoring on the SAT in the state: 

Northview High School – 1227 (No. 3) 

Chattahoochee High School – 1191 (No. 6) 

Johns Creek High School – 1183 (No. 10) 

Milton High School – 1162 (No. 16) 

Roswell High School – 1157 (No. 17, tied) 

Alpharetta High School – 1157 (No. 17, tied) 

Cambridge High School – 1155 (No. 21) 

>> Find your school’s scores in our searchable database. Schools with less than 15 test-takers are not included.

 In other Education news:


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