A 'Bad and Boujee' Civil War lesson? One metro Atlanta teacher says yes


Eat your heart out, Migos! 

A teacher at Edwards Middle School in Conyers took the Atlanta rap group’s hit single “Bad and Boujee” and fashioned it for a Civil War lesson for his students. 

A snippet of “Mad and Losing” has been liked thousands of times on Twitter. In a full video posted on his YouTube page, Government and History teacher David Yancey spits about war battles and the Emancipation Proclamation. 

“It’s your boy Honest Abe,” Yancey, 31, begins over an instrumental track, “making this song to shut down the lames.”

The troops are mad and losing

Slowing them down is a doozy

Soldiers are ready and ruthless

With rifles and ironclads, too

In another video, Yancey tackles Adele’s “Hello” to teach his students about Cherokee Indians and the Removal Act of 1830.

Yancey, the school’s 2016 Teacher of the Year, said he began making songs based off his lessons about three years ago, to an overwhelming response from the students. Most of the songs, he admits, aren’t even in his playlist.

“A lot of them I don’t know the words to,” he said by phone Monday. “But the students like them.”

The songs always come after the lesson on the same subject. He said it’s his way of making sure the information sticks.

“It’s not just random things that are being thrown together,” he said. “I’m very intentional ... on what content I’m delivering. I’ll do the lesson, and I pull it all together in a song.

“I’ve seen kids (from a few years ago) bring up the songs.”


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