Ernie Suggs

Reporter for Enterprise

Ernie Suggs has been a reporter at the AJC since 1997, currently covering a variety of breaking news and investigative stories for page A1. He previously reported for newspapers in New York City and Durham, N.C. A veteran of more than 20 years as a newspaper reporter, Suggs has covered stories ranging from politics to civil rights to higher education. A 1990 graduate of North Carolina Central University, with a degree in English Literature, Suggs was also a Harvard University Nieman Fellow. He is currently on the Nieman Board of Trustees and the former national vice president of the National Association of Black Journalists. His appreciation for Prince and the New York Yankees is unmatched.

Latest from Ernie Suggs

Spike Lee and how ‘School Daze’ made black colleges matter 
 Thirty years ago this month — “A Different World” was still finding its way, and “The Quad” was still a generation in the future — Atlanta-born filmmaker Spike Lee introduced a large portion of the culture to black colleges with his landmark film, “School Daze.”  “Today, 30 years...

Posted: 20 hours ago

Thirty years ago this month — “A Different World” was still finding its way, and “The Quad” was still a generation in the future — Atlanta-born filmmaker Spike Lee introduced a large portion of the culture to black colleges with his landmark film, “School Daze.”  “Today, 30 years...
Alumni giving at Claflin University sets national black college standard
 Whittaker V. Middleton, Claflin University’s vice president of institutional advancement, had just gotten off the road from a trip to Atlanta – but he wasn’t tired. He had just scored a $100,000 donation from an alumna to create a leadership academy. “I do a lot of traveling,” Middleton said. “You have...

Posted: 4 days ago

Whittaker V. Middleton, Claflin University’s vice president of institutional advancement, had just gotten off the road from a trip to Atlanta – but he wasn’t tired. He had just scored a $100,000 donation from an alumna to create a leadership academy. “I do a lot of traveling,” Middleton said. “You have...
Claflin University: Tiny South Carolina school shoots for the stars
 NOTE: This is one of two articles that describe the opposite fortunes of two HBCUs – Claflin University, which is flourishing, and Paine College, which is struggling to keep its accreditation.  When Henry N. Tisdale interviewed to become the president of Claflin College in 1994, he had one demand. At the time, the state&rsquo...

Posted: 5 days ago

NOTE: This is one of two articles that describe the opposite fortunes of two HBCUs – Claflin University, which is flourishing, and Paine College, which is struggling to keep its accreditation.  When Henry N. Tisdale interviewed to become the president of Claflin College in 1994, he had one demand. At the time, the state&rsquo...
HBCU Journeys: Graduates talk about their time on campus

Posted: 10 days ago

Sarah White Clark Atlanta University. Class of 1993. Currently an elementary school principal. I was born and raised in the city of Minneapolis. As an infant, I was adopted into a Caucasian family. (The family also adopted an African-American boy, who would become Sarah’s brother.) My parents were very good about trying to expose me...
THE CHOICE II: How one student found an HBCU with a little help from her parents
 Before she was #Hurtbae, Kourtney George was a high school senior trying to navigate her college choices.  A 2011 graduate of Woodward Academy, George’s Louisiana ties ran deep as both of her parents had gone to Southern University in Baton Rouge.  So she was headed to Louisiana State University – at least she thought...

Posted: 10 days ago

Before she was #Hurtbae, Kourtney George was a high school senior trying to navigate her college choices.  A 2011 graduate of Woodward Academy, George’s Louisiana ties ran deep as both of her parents had gone to Southern University in Baton Rouge.  So she was headed to Louisiana State University – at least she thought...
HBCUs started in the North, were needed most in the South
 The first historically black colleges were founded in the North, although 90 percent of HBCUs eventually were located in the South.  But black schools were forbidden in the South before the Civil War. It was not until 1865, the end of the war, that HBCUs began appearing in Southern states.  And suddenly they were cropping up...

Posted: 11 days ago

The first historically black colleges were founded in the North, although 90 percent of HBCUs eventually were located in the South.  But black schools were forbidden in the South before the Civil War. It was not until 1865, the end of the war, that HBCUs began appearing in Southern states.  And suddenly they were cropping up...
Wiley Bolden, 99: Long life was dedicated to education
 Wiley Bolden spent nearly a century as an educator, from working as a professor at Georgia State University to leading both Savannah State University and Morris Brown College. But he always had time to stop, pause, and smell the roses. “He knew the names of almost every tree and plant. He would see one and just name it and tell us about...

Posted: 11 days ago

Wiley Bolden spent nearly a century as an educator, from working as a professor at Georgia State University to leading both Savannah State University and Morris Brown College. But he always had time to stop, pause, and smell the roses. “He knew the names of almost every tree and plant. He would see one and just name it and tell us about...
HBCUs: Born in the North but most needed in the South
 Forget the football duels between North Carolina Central and North Carolina A&T. It doesn’t matter if Howard or Hampton is the real “HU.” The biggest rivalry in the black college universe might be between Cheney University and Lincoln University — two very old schools separated by 24 miles of U.S. 1 in the rural outskirts...

Posted: 12 days ago

Forget the football duels between North Carolina Central and North Carolina A&T. It doesn’t matter if Howard or Hampton is the real “HU.” The biggest rivalry in the black college universe might be between Cheney University and Lincoln University — two very old schools separated by 24 miles of U.S. 1 in the rural outskirts...
Kennesaw State student: ‘I didn’t think I would fit in at an HBCU’
 NOTE: Delanie Mason and Kendall Youngblood made different choices when it came to deciding whether to attend an HBCU. This is one of two articles that profile the women and explain their decisions. Read Kendall’s story here. There was something different about Delanie Mason when she moved into her freshman dorm at Kennesaw...

Posted: 12 days ago

NOTE: Delanie Mason and Kendall Youngblood made different choices when it came to deciding whether to attend an HBCU. This is one of two articles that profile the women and explain their decisions. Read Kendall’s story here. There was something different about Delanie Mason when she moved into her freshman dorm at Kennesaw...
THE CHOICE: Black students weigh HBCUs against mostly white schools
 For college-bound African-Americans, choosing between a historically black college and a predominantly white one has become more complicated with each passing year. Delanie Mason, who grew up in Gwinnett County, goes to Kennesaw State, even though her parents and siblings all chose HBCUs. Kendall Youngblood, after a year at the University...

Posted: 12 days ago

For college-bound African-Americans, choosing between a historically black college and a predominantly white one has become more complicated with each passing year. Delanie Mason, who grew up in Gwinnett County, goes to Kennesaw State, even though her parents and siblings all chose HBCUs. Kendall Youngblood, after a year at the University...
President Trump nominates Alveda King for Frederick Douglass commission
 Alveda King, a niece of Martin Luther King Jr., and a staunch supporter of Donald Trump, has been nominated by the president to serve on the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Commission.  The announcement comes roughly a year after Trump implied that Douglass, a former slave turned social reformer and abolitionist, was still alive. ...

Posted: 12 days ago

Alveda King, a niece of Martin Luther King Jr., and a staunch supporter of Donald Trump, has been nominated by the president to serve on the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Commission.  The announcement comes roughly a year after Trump implied that Douglass, a former slave turned social reformer and abolitionist, was still alive. ...