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Police: Roaches found in bed, clothing in home where 5 kids lived


A Cobb County mother and her live-in boyfriend allowed five children to live in a filthy, roach-infested home, according to police.

“The residence has a foul odor and there are roaches in the cabinets, refrigerator, the bedrooms, the floors, and windows,” arrest warrants state. “The children sleep in the bed where there are roaches, and the roaches get into their clothing.”

The children, who range in age from infant to 12 years old, were often left alone in the Clay Road mobile home without a way to contact anyone in an emergency, according to Cobb police. All five children, whose names were not released, were placed in protective custody, police said Wednesday.

The children’s mother, Judith Najarro De Leon, and Jose Angel Diaz, referred to as “dad” or “step dad” by the children, were both arrested Saturday and charged with five counts of contributing to the delinquency of a minor, arrest records show.

De Leon was released from the Cobb jail the following day on $7,500 bond. Diaz, who was arrested in January in a separate domestic violence case, remained in jail Wednesday night.



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