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No bond for man accused of fatally shooting his cousin


No bond was set for the Atlanta man accused in the fatal shooting of his cousin, a 15-year-old high school football player, officials said.

Charged with murder, Dontavious Montgomery, 21, waived his first-appearance hearing Wednesday in connection with the death of Marquez Montgomery, who was a student-athlete at Mays High School.

Dontavious Montgomery was out on $100,000 bond from a previous murder charge at the time of his cousin’s death, police said. In January 2015, he was charged with murder, aggravated assault and other offenses in connection with the death of Nicholas Roberts, police spokesman Lukasz Sajdak said. Montgomery was released from the Fulton County jail in October 2015.

Dontavious Montgomery has a hearing scheduled for Dec. 14, Fulton County sheriff’s spokeswoman Tracy Flanagan said.

Marquez Montgomery was shot in the head at his home in southwest Atlanta on Monday night, police said. According to a report obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, a preliminary investigation indicates Marquez Montgomery was “shot by the suspect with no provocation,” police said.



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