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Supreme Court reinstates key parts of Trump’s travel ban


The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday reinstated key parts of President Donald Trump’s revised travel ban — with some exceptions — while agreeing to hear constitutional arguments over the directive.

The case comes with significant implications for Georgia, a popular destination for immigrants, refugees and tourists and home to the world’s busiest airport. 

In a 13-page ruling, the court granted the Trump administration’s request to let it block for 90 days visitors from six Muslim-majority countries, freeze the nation’s refugee resettlement program for 120 days and limit the number of refugees who may be brought here this fiscal year to 50,000. But the court said those restrictions cannot be applied to those with a “bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.” 

TRAVEL BAN: Revised Trump travel ban on hold 

 

LIVING IN FEAR: Anxiety grips immigrants in Georgia

“As to these individuals and entities, we do not disturb the injunction,” the court said in its ruling. “But when it comes to refugees who lack any such connection to the United States, for the reasons we have set out, the balance tips in favor of the government’s compelling need to provide for the nation’s security.” 

Trump praised the court’s decision Monday, calling it “a clear victory for our national security. It allows the travel suspension for the six terror-prone countries and the refugee suspension to become largely effective. 

“As president,” he continued, “I cannot allow people into our country who want to do us harm. I want people who can love the United States and all of its citizens, and who will be hardworking and productive.   My number one responsibility as commander in chief is to keep the American people safe. Today's ruling allows me to use an important tool for protecting our nation's homeland.”

Paedia Mixon, CEO of New American Pathways, an Atlanta-area refugee resettlement organization, said she was disappointed in the court’s decision.  

“During the worst refugee crisis in history,” she said in a prepared statement, “this action hinders organizations like New American Pathways from being able to deliver refugee families seeking safety and stability out of harm’s way. At this time, we are awaiting information from the State Department and our national resettlement agencies on how this decision will impact our arrivals.”


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