Learn to make turnip cakes from Suzy Siu’s Baos


From the menu … Suzy Siu’s Baos, Krog Street Market, 99 Krog St., Atlanta; 404-996-6504. 

My friends and I recently went out to dinner at the Krog Street Market. We loved having so many food and drink choices. It a great way to taste all the different Atlanta cuisines and a great option when going out in a large group with varying tastes. While everything was delicious, I especially enjoyed the turnip cake in the soft rice bun from Suzy Siu’s. Would they share the recipe? Thank you. — Ruth Perou, Atlanta

Interestingly, although these are called turnip cakes, they’re actually radish cakes. Courtney Graham of Suzy Siu’s sent the recipe and told us, “We actually use daikon which is a Chinese radish very similar to turnips. You can use hakurei and/or regular turnips as well. “We tested the recipe with a mix of half daikon and half hakurei turnips.

You’ll find pickled mustard greens at stores carrying Asian groceries.

At Suzy Siu’s, they steam the radish mixture in casings which makes it easy for them to cut slices for frying and serving. Our recipe will make squares instead of circles, and it’s a third the size they make at the restaurant. You can cut it down again if you like.

They serve the turnip cakes on bao garnished with a soy and black vinegar aioli. You can make the aioli by whisking together 1 cup mayonnaise, 4 tablespoons soy sauce and 4 tablespoons black vinegar. Then garnish with chopped cilantro and fried onions also available at stores that carry Asian groceries.


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