You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myAJC.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myAJC.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myAJC.com.

Schnitzel, simplified and amplified


I appreciate any winter dish that offers big flavors in a relatively spare profile, and this one fits the bill. A schnitzel is characterized by thin meat, a crunchy coating and pan-frying. In this riff, you'll opt out of the last and bake instead - a choice that eliminates some fat but mostly helps its mustard-based, herby pretzel exterior stay in place. No flour and egg steps here, which saves time and simplifies the typical schnitzel method.

While the meat is in the oven - beef, in this case - you'll boil the egg noodles, toast caraway seeds and saute an onion. Their happy union provides a soft and aromatic counterpoint.

---

Pretzel-Crusted Schnitzel With Caraway Onion Noodles

3 or 4 servings

In addition to the beef tenderloin, we also tested this with flap steak, a less expensive cut of beef that comes from the bottom sirloin; that schnitzel was only slightly chewier, so we think it'd be a fine alternative. Because it's a thinner cut to begin with, you may not need to pound it.

Serve with a green salad.

Based on a recipe from CertifiedAngusBeef.com.

Ingredients

Leaves from 4 stems flat-leaf parsley

Leaves from 3 stems thyme

6 ounces salted pretzel sticks or mini pretzels

Kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper

1-pound piece beef tenderloin or filet mignon (may substitute flap steak; see headnote)

1/4 cup Dijon mustard

6 ounces dried wide egg noodles

1 medium yellow onion

2 teaspoons caraway seed

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

1/2 cup low-sodium beef broth

Steps

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper or aluminum foil.

Finely chop the parsley and thyme leaves, placing them in a shallow container or plate. You should have about 3 tablespoons total.

Place the pretzels in a food processor and pulse until they're reduced to pebbly crumbs but are not powdery (or simply place in a quart-size zip-top bag and crush them). You should have about 1 1/2 cups. Add to the parsley and thyme leaves; season lightly with salt and pepper, then stir to incorporate.

Trim away any excess fat from the tenderloin. Cut the meat into 1/4-inch round slices, placing them at least an inch apart on a large piece of plastic wrap on the counter. Cover with another large piece of plastic wrap. Use a heavy pan or meat pounder to flatten the slices evenly thin (about half as thick as they were). Remove the top plastic wrap, then use a spoon to place a dollop of mustard on top of each flattened piece of beef. Use the back of the spoon to spread it evenly over each one.

Working with one at a time, transfer the pieces to the pretzel mixture, mustard sides down, and press gently so the crumbs adhere; transfer the pieces, crumbed sides down, to the baking sheet. Repeat the dollop-and-spread with the remaining mustard on the uncoated sides of the beef, then press handfuls of the remaining pretzel crumb mixture so the mustard is completely covered. Generously grease the top side of each piece of schnitzel with cooking oil spray. Bake (middle rack) for 12 to 15 minutes, until lightly golden brown. The meat should be cooked just through.

Meanwhile, bring a pot of water to a boil over medium-high heat. Add a generous pinch of salt, then the egg noodles. Cook according to the package directions (to al dente).

While the noodles are cooking, cut the onion in half, then into very thin slices.

Toast the caraway seed in a large nonstick saute pan or skillet over medium heat for a minute or two, just until fragrant. Transfer to a small plate.

Return the pan to medium heat. Add the butter; once it has melted, stir in the onion. Cook for about 6 minutes, stirring often, until the onion has just softened. Add the broth, and season lightly with salt and pepper.

Drain the noodles and immediately add them to the pan along with the toasted caraway seed, stirring to incorporate.

Divide among individual wide, shallow bowls, including some of the broth. Top each portion with some schnitzel. Serve warm.

Nutrition | Per serving (based on 4): 560 calories, 36 g protein, 69 g carbohydrates, 16 g fat, 7 g saturated fat, 120 mg cholesterol, 770 mg sodium, 3 g dietary fiber, 2 g sugar

Author Information:

Bonnie S. Benwick


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Cooking and Recipes

These warm-weather wines won't compete with the grill
These warm-weather wines won't compete with the grill

When the temperature soars, I often prefer red wines that have not been aged in oak or treated with wood in any way. Here are three examples of unoaked reds. Give them just a slight chill and enjoy them during your cookouts. For good measure, we also have a crisp sauvignon blanc and a floral rosé. - Dave McIntyre - - - GREAT VALUE 2.5 stars...
Novelist Mary Kay Andrews pens beachy-keen cookbook
Novelist Mary Kay Andrews pens beachy-keen cookbook

For Atlanta novelist Mary Kay Andrews , life’s a beach and then you … Well, then you wiggle out of that sticky wet swimsuit and dive into a nice cold bowl of Beyond the Grave Chicken Salad. Or you call some friends, ice down the beer, and fix Low Country Boil: a peel-and-eat mess of crab, shrimp, sausage, fresh...
5 myths about beer
5 myths about beer

Summer for Americans is a time of backyard barbecues, baseball and beer. Memorial Day weekend is a perfect chance to sit outside with the season's first sixer, and the varieties of beer you can pick up at the local grocer have multiplied. "This is a golden age for beer lovers," as the Washington Post reported in 2016. Yet the sheer number...
The ideal aperitif: Good vermouth, cool and fragrant
The ideal aperitif: Good vermouth, cool and fragrant

One summer evening a few years ago, I was standing in the Napa Valley kitchen of Steve Matthiasson, a farmer and winemaker, when he handed me a tumbler filled with amber liquid and a fat cube of ice. It was not what I was expecting from Matthiasson, who, with his wife, Jill Klein Matthiasson, makes a range of wonderfully pure and refreshing wines from...
Charcoal or gas? Depends on what you’re grilling
Charcoal or gas? Depends on what you’re grilling

Gas or charcoal? It is a question that has bedeviled American consumers and cooks for decades, since the first LazyMan propane grill went on sale in the 1950s and left the Smiths with their briquette-fueled brazier looking jealously over the fence at the Joneses and their new outdoor science stove. In the abstract, there is no one correct answer. You...
More Stories