Duck’s Cranberry Pear Relish is easy to make at home


Duck’s Cosmic Kitchen makes the most delicious Cranberry Pear Relish. I buy it by the pint to share with friends and enjoy at home. Would they share the recipe? — Henry Jacob, Atlanta

Cindy Diamond sent us this recipe with a note it’s something they prepare each year, a favorite for their customers. The addition of pears to the cranberries is a little unexpected but just as seasonally right as cranberries with apples. They add a little orange extract to the mixture to bump up the citrus and recommend a good quality extract like the ones from Nielsen Massey.

You’ll want to plan ahead for this recipe as you need pears that are not too ripe and not too firm. Stock up on cranberries when they’re available around the winter holidays and keep a few bags in your freezer. This relish is just as delicious with grilled chicken as it is with holiday turkey or ham.

<<Get more must-make recipes here

Duck’s Cranberry Pear Relish

1 (12-ounce) bag fresh cranberries, rinsed

1 cup granulated sugar

2 semi-firm fresh pears, peeled, cored and cut into 1/8-inch dice

Zest of 1 orange

1/4 teaspoon orange extract

In a medium saucepan, combine cranberries and sugar and cook over medium heat until cranberries soften and break down, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and add pears, orange zest and orange extract. Allow to cool, then cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. Makes: 4 cups

Per 1/4-cup serving: 74 calories (percent of calories from fat, 1), trace protein, 18 grams carbohydrates, 1 gram fiber, trace fat (no saturated fat), no cholesterol, trace sodium.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Food

Don’t judge a wine by the grape on its label
Don’t judge a wine by the grape on its label

The word “varietal” is among the most misused in wine. Many people think of it as a synonym for “grape,” as in, “What varietals are in that wine?” Not to be pedantic, but that is wrong. Varietal is not a noun, it is an adjective. One may properly refer to a “varietal wine,” like a cabernet sauvignon or...
Exploring the sweet subtleties of vinegar
Exploring the sweet subtleties of vinegar

When Edward Lee was growing up in Brooklyn, his grandmother fermented traditional Korean foods at home to stock the pantry, making her own gochujang and doenjang, along with several kinds of kimchi and rice vinegars. Lee now makes his own vinegars at 610 Magnolia, his restaurant in Louisville, Kentucky, using whole raw persimmons, peaches and fennel...
Pesto in winter? Of course, and here are wines that match the richness
Pesto in winter? Of course, and here are wines that match the richness

This rich pasta dish calls for bright and lively wines that will either complement the richness, cut through it or, in an ideal pairing, both. Any of these three wines— a Champagne, a gruner veltliner from Austria or a sauvignon blanc from California — will do the job nicely. Make this: Winter Pesto With the food processor running, drop...
Macaroni and cheese for grown-ups
Macaroni and cheese for grown-ups

When it comes to macaroni and cheese, it’s time to think outside the box. You know the box we mean. It’s bright, shiny blue. And the macaroni and cheese that comes out of it is bright, shiny orange. The boxed stuff is fine for kids. It’s fast and cheap, and they can’t tell the difference. But for adults, it’s time to do...
Chocolate-coffee ice cream and cake squares put good things together
Chocolate-coffee ice cream and cake squares put good things together

Cake and ice cream make a good couple. They balance each other out. One’s churned cold, the other’s baked hot. One’s creamy, the other crumbles. One loves cold weather, the other resents it. Blistering marital bliss. Ice cream insists on arctic temperatures; show it a cupboard or countertop, and it goes all drippy. Give cake a shelf...
More Stories