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Curry chicken a fast, savory dish


Add a little curry powder to roasted chicken and vegetables for a quick, tasty dinner.

For this quick meal, I used curry powder from the supermarket spice section. Strictly speaking, prepared curry powder doesn’t really exist in India. Good cooks prefer to make their own blend of spices using the freshest ingredients. The curry powder found in the markets should be used within 3 to 4 months. After that it loses some of its flavor.

Fred Tasker’s wine suggestion: Curry calls for a white wine with lots of fruit and a bit of sweetness; I’d try a viognier.

Helpful Hints:

— A Golden Delicious apple can be used instead of the Granny Smith.

— Minced garlic can be found in the produce section of the market or crush and use 1 medium garlic clove instead.

— Add another 1/4 teaspoon curry powder if you like it spicy hot.

Countdown:

— Prepare the ingredients.

— Make chicken.

— Microwave rice while chicken cooks.

Shopping List:

Here are the ingredients you’ll need for tonight’s Dinner in Minutes.

To buy: 1 bottle curry powder, 1 Granny Smith apple, 1 tomato, 1 container fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth, 3/4 pound cooked chicken breast, 1 small box raisins, 1/2 pound green beans, 1 package frozen diced onion, 1 package microwaveable white rice and 1 carton plain non-fat yogurt.

Staples: canola oil, minced garlic, flour, cinnamon, salt and black peppercorns.

———

CURRIED CHICKEN

Recipe by Linda Gassenheimer

2 teaspoons canola oil

1/2 tablespoon curry powder

1 cup frozen diced onion

1 teaspoon minced garlic

2 cups green beans, cut into 2-inch pieces

1 tart apple (Granny Smith), cored and cut into cubes (about 1 1/2-cups)

1 tablespoon flour

1 cup fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth

10 ounces cooked chicken breast cut into 1/2-1inch pieces (about 1 1/2-cups)

1/4 cup raisins

1 medium tomato cut into small wedges

1/4 cup non-fat plain yogurt

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the curry powder, onion, garlic, green beans and apple. Saute 5 minutes. Sprinkle in the flour and stir until absorbed by vegetables, about 30 seconds. Add the broth and simmer until broth thickens, 2 minutes. Stir in the chicken, raisins and tomatoes. Simmer 2 to 3 minutes to warm the chicken. Remove from heat and stir in the yogurt, cinnamon and add salt and pepper to taste.

Yield 2 servings.

Per serving: 481 calories (20 percent from fat), 10.5 g fat (1.7 g saturated, 5.1 g monounsaturated), 126 mg cholesterol, 50.6 g protein, 54 g carbohydrates, 9.8 g fiber, 602 mg sodium.

QUICK RICE

Recipe by Linda Gassenheimer

1 package microwaveable white rice to make 1 1/2-cups cooked rice

1 teaspoon canola oil

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Microwave rice according to package instructions. Measure 1 1/2-cups cooked rice into a bowl and save any remaining rice for another time. Mix oil and salt and pepper to taste into the rice.

Yield 2 servings.

Per serving: 189 calories (12 percent from fat), 2.6 g fat (0.3 g saturated, 1.5 g monounsaturated), no cholesterol, 3.3 g protein, 37 g carbohydrates, 0.6 g fiber, 2 mg sodium.


Reader Comments ...


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