Creations roasts cauliflower for satisfying couscous substitute


At the Creations restaurant at the Art Institute of Atlanta we had a wonderful time and meal. One of the dishes I enjoyed was the Cauliflower “Couscous.” Could you please get the recipe?— Patti Stone, Fayetteville

Cauliflower is truly having its day as people look for carb-free substitutes for some of their favorite dishes. Chef John Oechsner shared the recipe for this dish where the cauliflower is roasted and then finely chopped to resemble couscous. You’ll find it’s quick to prepare and very satisfying.

To make quick work of mincing the carrots, he suggests you can cut a carrot coarsely and then pulse it in a food processor. When he makes this dish at home, he uses a tabletop toaster/convection oven that eliminates having to heat up a large oven for roasting the cauliflower.

Creations’ Cauliflower Couscous

1 small cauliflower, broken into florets (about 3/4 pound)

3 tablespoons olive oil, divided

Salt and pepper

1/3 cup small diced onion

1/2 cup minced carrots

1/3 cup small diced red bell pepper

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 teaspoon turmeric

Zest and juice of 1 lemon

2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley or mint

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Arrange cauliflower florets on a rimmed baking sheet and drizzle with 2 tablespoons olive oil. Toss to coat and season lightly with salt. Roast until nicely browned at edges, stirring occasionally, about 25 minutes. Do not overcook. Cauliflower should still be firm. Remove from oven and allow to cool.

In the bowl of a food processor, pulse cauliflower until it resembles couscous. Do not overprocess or make a puree. Set aside.

In a large skillet, heat remaining tablespoon olive oil over medium-high heat. Add onion and cook until just translucent. Add carrots, peppers, garlic and turmeric and cook 1 to 2 minutes. Add reserved cauliflower and cook until heated through, stirring constantly. Add lemon zest, lemon juice and chopped parsley or mint. Season to taste and serve hot or warm. Serves: 4

Per serving: 138 calories (percent of calories from fat, 66), 2 grams protein, 10 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams fiber, 10 grams fat (1 gram saturated), trace cholesterol, 33 milligrams sodium.



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