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2 Atlanta streets closed, Homeland Security called to mercury investigation

Barbecue pork dish takes only 10 minutes


This roast pork dinner with a soy, garlic and honey glaze is inspired by one of my favorite Chinese dishes, Chinese Barbecue Pork (Char Sui Pork.) It’s made by marinating pork overnight and roasting it in the oven over water. This is a streamlined version that has similar flavor, but takes only 10 minutes to make. I butterfly the pork by cutting it almost in half lengthwise. This helps shorten the cooking time.

Steamed fresh noodles are cooked in the microwave to save time. There is no need to boil water or dirty another pot. They’re then finished with the bok choy in the same skillet used to cook the pork.

Fred Tasker’s wine suggestion: The sweetness of this dish would go well with a ripe pinot noir.

Helpful hints:

Any green vegetable can be used instead of bok choy.

Soy sauce and garlic are used in both recipes. Measure them at one time and divide accordingly.

Steamed or fresh Chinese noodles can be found in the produce section of the supermarket.

Toasted sesame oil is available in most supermarkets. Plain sesame oil can be used instead.

Use same skillet for pork and noodles.

Countdown:

Microwave noodles and set aside.

Prepare remaining ingredients.

Make pork.

Cook noodles and bok choy in same skillet as pork.

Shopping list:

Here are the ingredients you’ll need for tonight’s Dinner in Minutes.

To buy: 3/4 pound pork tenderloin, 1 bottle toasted sesame oil, 1 package fresh or steamed Chinese noodles and one small bulb bok choy.

Staples: garlic, honey, low-sodium soy sauce, salt and black peppercorns.

Chinese Pan Roasted Pork

Recipe by Linda Gassenheimer

3/4 lb. pork tenderloin

1/2 Tbsp. low-sodium soy sauce

1 Tbsp. honey

1 medium garlic clove, crushed

1 tsp. toasted sesame oil

Butterfly the pork. Cut it almost in half lengthwise and open like a book. Stir together the soy sauce, honey and garlic in a small bowl. Set aside. Heat oil in a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add pork and sauté 4 minutes. Turn and sauté 4 minutes. A meat thermometer should read 145 degrees. Remove to a plate. Divide into 2 portions. Add sauce to pan and cook 30 seconds to 1 minute. The sauce should reduce, but not disappear. Spoon sauce over pork. Do not rinse skillet and use for noodles and bok choy.

Yield 2 servings

Per serving: 242 calories (22 percent from fat), 5.9 g fat (1.5 g saturated, 2.2 g monounsaturated), 108 mg cholesterol, 36.1 g protein, 9.3 g carbohydrates, 0.1 g fiber, 219 mg sodium.

Stir-Fried Bok Choy and Noodles

Recipe by Linda Gassenheimer

1/4 lb. fresh or steamed Chinese noodles (about 2 cups)

1/2 cup water

1 garlic clove, crushed

1 Tbsp. low-sodium soy sauce

1 Tbsp. toasted sesame oil

4 cups sliced bok choy

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Place noodles and water in a microwave-safe bowl. Cover with plastic wrap or plate and heat on high 2 minutes. Stir and heat on high 2 more minutes. Noodles will absorb all the water. Remove and let stand, covered, until needed. Pour off water if there is any excess. Mix the garlic and soy sauce together. Heat the oil in the skillet over high heat. Add the bok choy and noodles and toss 1 minute. Add the soy sauce and toss another minute. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve with the pork.

Yield 2 servings.

Per serving: 303 calories (28 percent from fat), 9.6 g fat (1.7 g saturated, 3.4 g monounsaturated), 48 mg cholesterol, 10.9 g protein, 44.6 g carbohydrates, 3.4 g fiber, 360 mg sodium.


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