Orson Welles mysterious unfinished masterpiece to be completed by Netflix


One of the most famous unfinished films in cinema history is about to get an ending, a restoration and “wide release” by Netflix when it’s completed

The movie, “The Other Side of the Wind,” starring John Huston, Peter Bogdanovich, and Dennis Hopper among others, was the last film by legendary producer, director and actor Orson Welles, but he died of a heart attack in 1985 before he could finish it.

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It was supposed to be Welles’ comeback movie when he returned to Hollywood after spending years in Europe, Vanity Fair reported.

Although the movie is about a director who returns to Hollywood after years away to make a comeback movie, Welles said the movie was not about himself.  

Netflix announced this week it had acquired the global rights to the film.

“Like so many others who grew up worshiping the craft and vision of Orson Welles, this is a dream come true,” Netflix Chief Content Officer, Ted Sarandos said in a statement about the company’s plans for the film.

“The promise of being able to bring to the world this unfinished work of Welles with his true artistic intention intact, is a point of pride for me and for Netflix,” Sarandos said. 

Netflix has acquired global rights to Orson Welles' unfinished final film.

Posted by Variety on Wednesday, March 15, 2017

The original production manager on “The Other Side of the Wind” in 1970 was Frank Marshall. Marshall has led the effort to finish the film for the past four decades and will now act as producer in overseeing its completion.

“I can’t quite believe it, but after 40 years of trying, I am so very grateful for the passion and perseverance from Netflix that has enabled us to, at long last, finally get into the cutting room to finish Orson’s last picture,” Marshall said.

No word, yet, on when the film will be completed.

Production on “The Other Side of the Wind” -- which would have been Welles’ 28th feature film -- began in 1970 and continued sporadically until 1976, after funding had run out.

Posted by CBS News on Wednesday, March 15, 2017


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