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Gary Sinise gets iconic Hollywood honor


Actor Gary Sinise, 62, finally got his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

In an interview with Variety Magazine, Sinise said the moment felt a “little bit surreal” but he felt honored to be awarded the big milestone in Hollywood.

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Sinise was humble throughout the ordeal.

>> RELATED: Gary Sinise continues being a champ for veterans with this generous donation to a wounded warrior

The “Forrest Gump” actor has dedicated much of his life outside of acting to giving back to veterans and active-duty military members.

Sinise said that he “was called to a new level of service” following the attacks on September 11, 2001. He didn’t want to see the men and women who signed up for service in the masses to be “treated shamefully,” as the country once had to Vietnam veterans returning from war. Since then, Sinise got involved in supporting vets where he could.

“As a private citizen, I’m just trying to do what I can to make sure they know that they’re appreciated and what they do is not taken for granted. I just want them to know that somebody like me cares about them,” he said. “That’s it, and if that can help make them feel a little stronger and a little better, then that’s a good way to serve.”


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