Black History Month


A flat Pepsi: Tone-deaf commercial pulled after protests

Aurielle Lucier remembers the last time she came face to face with a police officer. It was November 2014 and she was one of hundreds of young activists who had taken over Atlantic Station to protest the sudden wave of violence against blacks by police. A local leader of the Black Lives Matter movement at the time, Lucier was taken into custody and held for nine hours before being released. &ldquo...
HUD Secretary Ben Carson refers to slaves as ‘immigrants’

HUD Secretary Ben Carson refers to slaves as ‘immigrants’

In the country’s raging debate about immigration, and moments after the White House issued its second travel ban on Monday, HUD Secretary Ben Carson referred to slaves as “immigrants” in a speech to department employees. “That’s what America is about, a land of dreams and opportunity,” Carson said Monday. “There were other immigrants who came here in the bottom...
Simone Biles: Gold medal Olympic gymnast soars to new heights

Simone Biles: Gold medal Olympic gymnast soars to new heights

She’s likely the smallest person ever to carry the American flag during an Olympics Closing Ceremony. But there’s no disputing that gymnast Simone Biles rose head and shoulders above much of the world at last summer’s Rio Games. Nicknamed “$imoney” for her unfailing ability to nail routines, Biles, 19, triple-flipped, double-twisted and split-leapt her way to the 2016...
Jean-Michel Basquiat: Artist made his colorful mark

Jean-Michel Basquiat: Artist made his colorful mark

Jean-Michel Basquiat made his mark on black history in the 1980s, becoming one of the most prominent painters of the late 20th century. The Brooklyn-bred artist, born Dec. 22, 1960, to a Haitian father and Puerto Rican mother, initially gained notoriety with a friend as the graffiti duo “SAMO©.” Known for their social aphorisms on classism and racism, the pair parted ways after about...
Matthew Henson: First African-American Arctic explorer

Matthew Henson: First African-American Arctic explorer

His early life sloshed at times, undefined like the open, wild sea. He ran away at 13 and walked to Baltimore, on the other side of Washington, D.C., from his birthplace in Charles County, Md. He was a stock clerk at a hat shop, and a valet. But the ocean was his destiny. He became an adept seaman, an invaluable member of the crew under Cmdr. Robert E. Peary on Peary’s most important voyage...
Mamie “Peanut” Johnson: Pitching pioneer

Mamie “Peanut” Johnson: Pitching pioneer

A strikeout was all Mamie Johnson needed to shut up Hank Bayliss’ taunts. The Kansas City Monarchs’ third baseman mocked the pitching great’s stature, referring to her as “Peanut” — a name unbefitting the size of Johnson’s spirit. And it was with that strikeout, the first of many, that Johnson got the greatest joy from defeating her opponents. Born in 1935...
Langston Hughes: Poet Laureate of the Negro Race

Langston Hughes: Poet Laureate of the Negro Race

The voice of Langston Hughes was the voice of black America. He knew rivers “ancient as the world and older than the flow of human blood in human veins.” He wondered if deferred dreams “dry up like a raisin in the sun?” When he doubted the country that had given him 400 years of slavery and Jim Crow, he cried, “Let America be the dream the dreamers dreamed.” Whether...
Madam C.J. Walker: Beauty industry pioneer and philanthropist

Madam C.J. Walker: Beauty industry pioneer and philanthropist

A black woman in the 19th century had limited career choices. They were maids, sharecroppers, or performed other unskilled labor. However, Sarah Breedlove, a laundress later known as Madam C.J. Walker, amassed a personal fortune as a beauty industry entrepreneur. She gave black women across the world a new career path. Walker was born in 1867 on a plantation in Delta, Louisiana, two years after the...
Atlanta honors women of civil rights movement with art dedication

Atlanta honors women of civil rights movement with art dedication

Aside from Rosa Parks, most of the commonly remembered civil rights leaders and figures tend to be male — the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., John Lewis and Ralph David Abernathy, just to name a few. The City of Atlanta’s Office of Cultural Affairs has decided that it’s time women of the civil rights movement received more attention. To accomplish this, a public art dedication...
Trump visits Smithsonian’s African American Museum with a King

Trump visits Smithsonian’s African American Museum with a King

Alveda King noticed two moments on Tuesday when President Donald Trump seemed visibly moved during his tour of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. The first came when his gaze fell on a stone auction block from Hagerstown, Md., on which slaves would stand before being sold. King, part of a small delegation to tour the new Smithsonian with the president, overheard Trump...
The Niagara Movement: A ‘mighty current’ of Negro activism

The Niagara Movement: A ‘mighty current’ of Negro activism

Before the NAACP, there was the Niagara Movement. The first few years of the 20th century were bleak for the anxious members of the civil rights movement. It was a rocky post-Reconstruction era, with the Supreme Court’s “separate but equal” decision of Plessy v. Ferguson and the accommodationist views of Booker T. Washington, with his “Atlanta Compromise” speech that...
The CIAA: The annual basketball tournament draws a crowd

The CIAA: The annual basketball tournament draws a crowd

The 2017 CIAA Basketball Tournament will be held Feb. 21-25 in Charlotte, N.C., and if history is any guide, the annual event is likely to draw more than 150,000 fans to North Carolina’s Queen City. The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association was founded and incorporated in Washington in 1912 as the Colored Intercollegiate Athletic Association and adopted its current name in 1950. It consists...
Ronald McNair: Challenger tragedy cut short scientist’s career

Ronald McNair: Challenger tragedy cut short scientist’s career

Ronald E. McNair marched up to the library in his little town of Lake City, S.C., to check out some books. The bespectacled 9-year-old was a serious student — he had started going to school at age 4 — and the books he wanted were about science and physics. Since this was 1959, McNair’s quest was a bold one. The librarian informed him that the library only served whites, and said...
Gwendolyn Brooks: The poet who illuminated the black experience

Gwendolyn Brooks: The poet who illuminated the black experience

Gwendolyn Brooks started her writing career at 11 when she mailed several poems to a community newspaper in Chicago to the surprise of her family. Brooks was a published poet by age 13. Writing compassionate poetry that illuminated the black experience, she is one of the most highly regarded and widely read poets of 20th-century American poetry. She won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1950, the first...
The Rosewood Massacre: How a lie destroyed a black town

The Rosewood Massacre: How a lie destroyed a black town

From the bruises on her body, it was clear Fannie Taylor had been beaten. The story she told to explain them away destroyed an all-black town in Florida and got several of its residents murdered. On New Year’s Day 1923, Taylor, then the 22-year-old wife of a mill worker, said a black man had assaulted her. She didn’t say rape, only that she’d been assaulted, but the word “assault&rdquo...
Mary McLeod Bethune: Educator and advocate for black women

Mary McLeod Bethune: Educator and advocate for black women

It began with a book, and defiance. It was the late 19th century, and a young Mary McLeod tagged along when her mother went to do some work at the home of the white family she’d once served as a slave. Mary ended up in the playhouse where the children did their studying. “They had pencils, slates, magazines and books,” Mary McLeod Bethune recounted to sociologist Charles Spurgeon...
7 books to help kids appreciate history of blacks in America

7 books to help kids appreciate history of blacks in America

From Nikki Grimes’ creative poetry honoring the Harlem Renaissance, to a powerhouse young adult novel that speaks to Black Lives Matter, here are seven new books for young people, timed to the month when homes and schools turn attention toward the history of blacks in America. “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee — his hands can’t hit what his eyes can’t see!&rdquo...
5 things author Michael Eric Dyson wants white America to know

5 things author Michael Eric Dyson wants white America to know

Author Michael Eric Dyson has written a compelling - and deeply personal - book about America and race. In his latest book, “Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America,” Dyson, an ordained Baptist minister, Georgetown Univerity professor and social critic, speaks frankly to white America and implores them to be honest about race and white privilege. Here are 5 points he...
Public Enemy: Prophets of Rage

Public Enemy: Prophets of Rage

These days, the name Flavor Flav invokes an image of a caricature and his catchphrase, “Yeaaaahhh, boyyy!” while Chuck D has parlayed his music career into a series of TV and movie appearances. But when the Long Island contingent of Flav (William Drayton), Chuck D (Carlton D. Ridenhour), Professor Griff (Richard Griffin) and Terminator X (Norman Rogers) met at Adelphi University in the...
SNCC: Student activists march toward civil rights

SNCC: Student activists march toward civil rights

It started at lunch counters in North Carolina and Nashville. Student activists decided that perhaps the most effective way to begin dismantling Jim Crow-era segregation laws was to sit down in places where they were, by custom and law, barred from being served. So in 1960, the “Whites only” establishments got wave after wave of black students entering and taking seats in a quiet but explicit...
Fulton County woman keeps connection to Gee’s Bend alive

Fulton County woman keeps connection to Gee’s Bend alive

Soon after her parents passed away, Marlene Bennett Jones returned to Gee’s Bend and stuffed every piece of clothing the couple owned into 15 garbage bags. They didn’t look like much, but all Jones needed were pieces of cloth. The moments she’d shared with her mother before her passing had sown a longing deep inside her, and it was time to purge. Back home in Fairburn, she emptied...
Million Man March: A day of atonement

Million Man March: A day of atonement

The crowd estimate was debated, but the enthusiasm of those who came was undisputed. The 1995 Million Man March on Washington, D.C. was a life-changing event for many. Organized and headlined by Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, the gathering was a call to black men to seek atonement for their discretions as well as encouragement to become better husbands, fathers, sons, brothers and friends...
Phillis Wheatley: America’s first black published poet

Phillis Wheatley: America’s first black published poet

In a 1774 letter to the Rev. Samson Occom, Phillis Wheatley wrote that civil and religious liberty are “so inseparably united, that there is little or no Enjoyment of one without the other.” No one can say for sure when she was born, but this much we know: Wheatley was a pioneering poet wiser than her years and before her time. Her words to Occom prove that much. Born in Senegal around...
Hosea Williams: His legacy lives on

Hosea Williams: His legacy lives on

Hosea Williams was a colorful Atlanta civil rights figure, often wearing his trademark denim bib overalls, red shirt and red Converse sneakers. After Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination in 1968, Williams’ focus became clear: He needed to nourish those who were suffering the most. “That fire would not let him rest until he started feeding the hungry, ” said former Atlanta...
Eddie Robinson: The power of one vision

Eddie Robinson: The power of one vision

Prior to this year’s Super Bowl LI, the National Football League honored Super Bowl XXII MVP Doug Williams and Paul “Tank” Younger, the first person from a historically black college to play in the NFL. Both proud products of Grambling State University, Williams and Younger were among several HBCU legends, including hall of famers, who were honored. The ceremony was cathartic for...
Public can weigh in on historic church’s future

Public can weigh in on historic church’s future

The public will get to weigh in on whether the historic sanctuary of West Hunter Street Baptist Church should become part of the National Park Service system. The park service hosted free public meetings this month (including this last one on Feb. 9)from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the former church’s dining hall) to consider the potential future of the church, once led by civil rights veteran the Rev...
Fredi Washington: Imitation of a life well-served

Fredi Washington: Imitation of a life well-served

A Savannah native, Washington was born in 1903, later moving up North as a child following the death of her mother. After being hired by Josephine Baker, she appeared in her first cabaret show, “Happy Honeysuckles,” at age 16. Washington’s celebrity is attached to the cultural movement that took place in Harlem in the 1920s and 1930s, and unlike most other black performers, she was...
Photographer journeys the Underground Railroad in Atlanta exhibit

Photographer journeys the Underground Railroad in Atlanta exhibit

After learning about slavery and the Underground Railroad in the fourth grade, photographer Jeanine Michna-Bales could not get the idea of walking 1,000 miles to freedom out of her mind. So, for 15 years, the Indiana native traveled North America, from Louisiana to the Canadian border, photographing stops along the Underground Railroad. The result of her years of research and travel is the exhibition...
Cudjoe Kazoola Lewis: Last known survivor of Atlantic slave trade

Cudjoe Kazoola Lewis: Last known survivor of Atlantic slave trade

The firsts in black history — Jackie Robinson, Barack Obama, Mae Jemison — are easy to find. The lasts are a little more difficult. Take Cudjoe Kazoola Lewis. In 1860, 53 years after Congress banned the import of Africans to the United States for the purpose of slavery, 20-year-old Cudjoe was one of about 110 people stolen from West Africa to be sold into bondage. The Clotilde, which landed...
1619: The first Africans arrive in the New World

1619: The first Africans arrive in the New World

When discussing slavery in America, it’s important to look at the numbers. Some experts estimate that during the slave trade to the New World, more than 12.5 million people were stolen from Africa between 1525 and 1866. Of those who traveled the treacherous journey, only 10.7 million survived the Middle Passage. Most captives were shipped directly to the Caribbean and South America, including...
Atlanta University Center: A symbol of educational excellence

Atlanta University Center: A symbol of educational excellence

Before he was walking red carpets, delivering memorable movie lines and getting all us Falcons fans to Rise Up, he was Samuel Jackson, Morehouse College graduate, class of 1972. Jackson’s Atlanta ties began where they do for many notable icons: the Atlanta University Center. The AUC, as it’s called, is the largest collective of black institutions of higher education. Located in southwest...
‘Too Heavy for Your Pocket’ looks at choices during civil rights fight

‘Too Heavy for Your Pocket’ looks at choices during civil rights fight

Playwright Jiréh Breon Holder’s first name comes from a passage in Genesis that reads “The Lord will provide,” and the phrase seems to apply to this young writer. In the past year, he completed his thesis at the Yale School of Drama, got a job at Emory University and is having one of his plays produced by the Alliance Theatre. (“Too Heavy for Your Pocket” runs...
Ethel Waters: Singer and Oscar-nominated actress broke barriers

Ethel Waters: Singer and Oscar-nominated actress broke barriers

Ethel Waters was a popular blues, jazz and gospel singer and Oscar-nominated actress often credited with helping open the doors for other African-Americans in entertainment. She was also the first African-American actress to star in a television series, “The Beulah Show,” a comedy series about a maid, which ran in the early 1950s. She had received a best supporting actress Oscar nomination...
Willie O’Ree: Breaking the color line on ice

Willie O’Ree: Breaking the color line on ice

We all know about Jackie Robinson, who in 1947 broke the Major League Baseball color line when he stepped onto the field for the Brooklyn Dodgers. We know less about a Canadian named Willie O’Ree, who on Jan. 18, 1958, made his debut with the Boston Bruins, becoming the first black person to play in the National Hockey League. The youngest of 13 children, O’Ree was born in 1935 in Fredericton...
‘Daddy King’ asserts influence on his famous son

‘Daddy King’ asserts influence on his famous son

Father and son had much in common. The son was the namesake of the father. Both were graduates of Morehouse College. Both married women of musical distinction. Both answered the call to the Baptist pulpit. Both championed civil rights for African-Americans. How much did the father shape the destiny of the son, Martin Luther King, Jr.? In his “Daddy King: An Autobiography” the Rev. Martin...
Ida B. Wells: Journalism Giant

Ida B. Wells: Journalism Giant

You cannot talk about resistance without discussing Ida B. Wells. Wells’ unwavering fight against black disenfranchisement displayed the necessity of black voices in activism. But for Wells — who was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People NAACP in 1909 — resistance was mightiest in her pen. In 1884, after the Holly Springs...
David T. Howard: From Georgia slave to Atlanta philanthropist

David T. Howard: From Georgia slave to Atlanta philanthropist

David T. Howard rose from slavery at his birth in Crawford County, Georgia in 1849, to being called “Atlanta’s most beloved citizen and the city’s pioneer businessman” in the Atlanta Daily World’s obituary of him in 1935. Howard, who took the name of his slave master after the Civil War, worked as a railroad porter in Atlanta before becoming an undertaker, with his mortuary...
Alvin Ailey choreographer finds inspiration in King’s speech

Alvin Ailey choreographer finds inspiration in King’s speech

Hope Boykin, long-time member of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, returned to the National Center for Civil and Human Rights in January, wondering if she’d have the same rendezvous with inspiration she’d had two years earlier. She’d just taught a master class at the museum, part of the Ailey company’s new Destination Dance initiative to offer year-round local programming...
What Donald Trump said about Black History Month and Frederick Douglass

What Donald Trump said about Black History Month and Frederick Douglass

To commemorate the beginning of Black History Month, President Donald Trump hosted a "listening session” with African-American aides and supporters and made some remarks to the media about famous historical figures, including Martin Luther King, Jr., abolitionists Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman and civil rights activist Rosa Parks.  Trump said that King was &ldquo...
Faye Wattleton: Champion for women’s rights and health care

Faye Wattleton: Champion for women’s rights and health care

Faye Wattleton set the bar high in the fight to improve women’s lives and access to health care. From 1978 to 1992, Wattleton served as president and CEO of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, a major provider of medical and education services for millions of women. By the time she left the organization, it had grown to become the nation’s seventh-largest nonprofit organization...
Greensboro sit-in: A movement begins

Greensboro sit-in: A movement begins

The lunch counter at the former F.W. Woolworth is attended by a set of chairs with red and green vinyl cushions and chrome tubular frames. As the centerpiece at the International Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro, N.C., it is a humble artifact. But it is an emblem of a profound change. Four black college students from North Carolina A&T State University sat down at this counter on...
In lynching apology, Georgia police chief calls it ‘Our darkest hour’

In lynching apology, Georgia police chief calls it ‘Our darkest hour’

A Georgia police chief’s apology Thursday night for his department’s role in a 1940 lynching of an African American man focused attention to a period he called his profession’s “darkest hour.” LaGrange chief Lou Dekmar, who is white, said the lynching of Austin Callaway — who was snatched by a band of armed white men from the city jail — never should...
Rescue of St. Simons schoolhouse also protects Gullah-Geechee culture

Rescue of St. Simons schoolhouse also protects Gullah-Geechee culture

Few places in the United States, let alone Georgia, have the cultural heritage of St. Simons Island. Not only is it a foundation for Gullah-Geechee culture, it’s one of the only places African-American culture was left alone during the early days of emancipation through the Jim Crow era. However, St. Simons almost lost a focal cultural landmark in 2011 when the nearly 100-year-old, single-room ...
Emmett Till is the subject of two books on the genealogy of trauma

Emmett Till is the subject of two books on the genealogy of trauma

The specter of Emmett Till refuses to stay buried. Recent reminders of the 14-year-old are often in the media. When the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture opened in September, Till’s glass-topped casket was placed on permanent exhibition, a reminder of the brutal lynching that forced America to confront its racist beliefs and perverted justice system...
Biography: Congressman John Lewis

Biography: Congressman John Lewis

John Robert Lewis (born February 21, 1940) is an American politician and was a leader in the American Civil Rights Movement. He was chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and played a key role in the struggle to end segregation. Lewis, a member of the Democratic Party, has represented Georgia's 5th congressional district (map) in the United States House of Representatives...

Former Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young hopes other cities can learn from Atlanta’s success. “It’s no accident that Atlanta is doing so well and most cities are not,” said Young, who is also a civil rights veteran. Young’s documentary, “Making of Modern Atlanta,” that addresses how the city moved forward when other’s didn’t, will be shown at 7:30 p.m...
Events around metro Atlanta to celebrate MLK Day

Events around metro Atlanta to celebrate MLK Day

Two years after the first African-American president of the United States moved into the White House, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial was finally erected in Washington, D.C. Since that time, racial tensions have grown more fraught, fueled by a number of police shootings of unarmed black men and acts of racially motivated violence like the mass killing at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C....
AKA sorority turns out in force to support ‘Hidden Figures’

AKA sorority turns out in force to support ‘Hidden Figures’

You may notice a sea of pink and green during the opening weeks of the highly praised film “Hidden Figures.” In real life, the three main characters were all members of one of the nation’s leading black Greek organizations, Alpha Kappa Alpha, which was founded in 1908 at Howard University and was the first black Greek letter sorority. Katherine G. Johnson (Taraji P...
Protesters demand removal of NYC statue hailing doctor who experimented on slave women

Protesters demand removal of NYC statue hailing doctor who experimented on slave women

NEW YORK — When Sharon Thompson was a girl, she used to get a bad feeling when she walked by an imposing statue of a man on the edge of Central Park near East Harlem.          On Thursday, Thompson learned the story behind the statue when a local news station produced a piece on it. The bronze sculpture commemorates James...
Opinion: Ida B. Wells offered solution to police violence while in Atlanta 100 years ago

Opinion: Ida B. Wells offered solution to police violence while in Atlanta 100 years ago

Given that the past half-century of police reforms have yielded such miserable results, it is time to reimagine the problem as one not of police but of extralegal killings of black Americans. In other words, as the problem of lynching. As historian Isabel Wilkerson and several other scholars have pointed out, these killings represent the continuation of lynching culture in the United States...
After bananas and nooses on campus, here’s how a student body president copes

After bananas and nooses on campus, here’s how a student body president copes

WASHINGTON — There is so much to Taylor Dumpson. She is a law and society major at American University, originally from a small community. She has her sights set on law school, and has dreams of one day opening a nonprofit community center, kind of like a one-stop shop that brings resources together. She likes to paint. She likes to draw. That is not what you'd find if you Google her, though...
Atlanta Hawks pay tribute to

Atlanta Hawks pay tribute to "Black Fives” for Black History Month: 5 things to do this week in Atlanta

Black History Month is coming to an end, but there are still a few more opportunities to learn something new about the experiences and contributions of black people.  Black History Month: 7 ways to celebrate in Atlanta This weekend, the Atlanta Hawks are paying homage to African American teams that existed before the NBA racially integrated.   The Alliance Theatre continues its tradition...
Jocelyn Dorsey: Atlanta's First African-American News Anchor

Jocelyn Dorsey: Atlanta's First African-American News Anchor

More than 40 years ago, when Jocelyn Dorsey entered the Atlanta market, she found herself at the center of controversy as not only WSB-TV's first African American news anchor but the first in the Atlanta market. "It was a very difficult time for me," she said in a recent interview for Black History Month by Cox Media Group. “The audience had to get used to me, which was a very...
Life with Gracie: Reading 1,000 books is just a start for this 5-year-old Georgia girl

Life with Gracie: Reading 1,000 books is just a start for this 5-year-old Georgia girl

You’ve heard of Daliyah Arana. Last week, I got the chance to meet her, her mom and dad and two siblings at the Southeast Atlanta Library. And if you’ve heard of the 5-year-old, that last bit of information will come as little surprise. Libraries are Daliyah’s favorite place to be in the world. The kid loves books and, most especially, reading them. It was a love affair born, according...
How Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. ad-libbed the 'I Have a Dream' speech

How Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. ad-libbed the 'I Have a Dream' speech

Clarence Jones, the advisor to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. who co-wrote an early draft of the "I Have A Dream Speech," recounted the story of how King delivered the most famous part of the speech spontaneously. Jones was part of a Television Critics Association panel about PBS's "The March." Denzel Washington provides the narration for director John...

5 Atlanta streets named after civil rights activists

You drive up and down them every day. Have you ever wondered who the people are that Atlanta's streets are named after? Some of the city's most traveled thoroughfares are named after prominent civil rights icons.Donald Lee Hollowell Parkway – A lawyer who practiced in Atlanta starting in 1952, Donald Lee Hollowell is best known for successfully suing the University of Georgia...
9 iconic black history landmarks to visit near Georgia

9 iconic black history landmarks to visit near Georgia

The National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., opened Sept. 24, 2016, and obtaining passes still seems about as difficult as scoring “Hamilton” tickets.  Featuring a collection with more than 36,000 historical elements, the new Smithsonian Institute museum has quickly become one of the country’s most popular sites for exploring black history...
Coretta Scott King opposed Jeff Sessions' nomination to federal bench in 1986 letter

Coretta Scott King opposed Jeff Sessions' nomination to federal bench in 1986 letter

The wife of late civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., Coretta Scott King, voiced opposition in 1986 to then-U.S. Attorney Jeff Sessions' nomination to the federal bench in a nine-page letter that was made public Tuesday. "Anyone who has used the power of his office as United States attorney to intimidate and chill the free exercise of the ballot by citizens should not be elevated to our...
Coretta Scott King opposed Jeff Sessions' nomination to federal bench in 1986 letter

Coretta Scott King opposed Jeff Sessions' nomination to federal bench in 1986 letter

The wife of late civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., Coretta Scott King, voiced opposition in 1986 to then-U.S. Attorney Jeff Sessions' nomination to the federal bench in a nine-page letter that was made public Tuesday. "Anyone who has used the power of his office as United States attorney to intimidate and chill the free exercise of the ballot by citizens should not be elevated to our...
Join Cobb NAACP’s celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. in Marietta

Join Cobb NAACP’s celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. in Marietta

In the literal whirlwind of a winter storm that iced over Cobb County, it’s easy to lose track of your calendar. But the day set aside to honor a civil rights icon is coming up, and don’t fret if you find yourself with a plan to celebrate. The Cobb County NAACP’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day event starts 10 a.m. Monday at Turner Chapel AME Church, 492 North Marietta...
How to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. in Kennesaw this weekend

How to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. in Kennesaw this weekend

Kennesaw and local churches are coming together this weekend to celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. — and you’re invited. Head to the Ben Robertson Community Center, 2753 Watts Drive, on Sunday for “United We Stand, Divided We Fall” from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The program was put together by Thankful Baptist Church’s Rev. John W. Harris and his wife...
Sandy Springs reveals 2017 MLK Day keynote speaker, event details 

Sandy Springs reveals 2017 MLK Day keynote speaker, event details 

Sandy Springs' annual tribute to Martin Luther King Jr. is just around the corner. The 11th yearly event will take place Jan. 16 at city hall, 7840 Roswell Road, at 10 a.m. City offices will be closed to observe the holiday.  The keynote speaker will be civil rights activist, broadcaster and Trumpet Awards founder Xernona Clayton. Other speakers include Reverend Ricardo Green of Mount...
DeKalb County announces 2017 MLK Day event time and speaker 

DeKalb County announces 2017 MLK Day event time and speaker 

A proud tradition returns to DeKalb County next Friday. The annual Martin Luther King Jr. celebration is set for Jan. 13, at 10 a.m. in the Maloof Auditorium in downtown Decatur, the county announced Tuesday morning.  The keynote address will be delivered by Francys Johnson, state president of the Georgia NAACP. Johnson is the senior minister at Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist Church in Pembroke...
'I may not get there with you'

'I may not get there with you'

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s last speech almost didn’t happen. The civil rights leader had been running a fever, and he thought a severe storm in Memphis, Tenn., would keep people from coming to the Mason Temple to hear him. So he planned to stay at the Lorraine Hotel and work on the Poor People’s Campaign, which was a priority. But King went to the Temple, and on April 3, 1968...
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